Blog post by Health Kultcha

If you or someone you know is sensitive to gluten you might be surprised to know that you may still be able to enjoy some wheat based breads.

Canberra locals, Lisabeth Gavins and her Naturopath Husband, Mark have been teaching Sourdough Bread Making and Fermented Foods Workshops for around 15 years. Over the years they have received overwhelming feedback from gluten sensitive people who are able to eat wheat bread, made using the authentic Sourdough method that they teach, with no symptoms. “But be warned”, says Lisabeth, “there are a lot of fake sourdoughs out there!”

So why is sourdough more digestible?

Many years ago the only way to make bread was with a “mother” Sourdough Culture that was passed down through generations and shared throughout communities. These live bacteria cultures were made up of wild yeast species and broad range lactobacillus bacteria. These cultures not only made the bread rise, but the bacteria pre-digested the gluten content in the grain through a fermentation process called lacto-fermentation, making grain more easily digestible and the nutrients more available.

“When bread became commercialised the sourdough method was forgotten. This was the start of all our problems with gluten. Our digestive systems just can’t handle grain that has not been fermented first,” said Health Kultcha Founder Lisabeth Gavins. “This is why gluten intolerance and Coeliacs is a modern day disease. We stopped fermenting our grain.”

These days wheat is sprayed with pesticides and herbicides, it’s irradiated for long term storage, it’s processed so the wheat germ and bran are removed, it’s bleached, and worst of all, it’s no longer fermented. 
So is our problem wheat, or what we have done to it?

“Major bread brands know that Sourdough is trending right now, and some have been busted adding vinegar to their loaves and calling it “sour” dough. This is completely deceiving as there is absolutely no lacto-fermentation taking place whatsoever.” Said Lisabeth

Baker’s yeast is one single bacteria species that was isolated, initially to brew beer, and later found to make bread rise quickly. So Bakers could say good-bye to the 4 – 6 hour proofing period used in the traditional sourdough method.

Lisabeth and Mark are the proud owners of a 120 year old Ancient Sourdough Culture that originates from Germany. It is available online at www.innerorigin.com

Why not try this:

Sourdough Spelt Hot Cross Bun Recipe

Ingredients

¾ cup active 120yr old Ancient Sourdough Culture
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1½ teaspoons mixed spice
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt
60g honey
50g melted butter (cooled) or oil
1 egg (optional)
1 cup Water or milk
150g currants, raisins & sultanas, or mixed dried fruit
4 cups Organic white or whole Spelt Flour – or a combination of the two

Method:

Activate the culture
Combine all ingredients in order listed
Mix flour in 1 cup at a time, stir in until it is too stiff to turn by hand. Leave a little excess flour for kneading.
Knead dough for a few minutes
Cut into 9 or 10 even pieces and roll into balls.
Place on a greased tray.
Place in a warming cupboard for 2-6 hours between 29 and 35 degrees C
Once risen, make up a thick paste with flour and water, thick enough so the mixture doesn’t run off the buns.
To make the crosses use a cake decorator, or a plastic bag with a hole cut in the corner
Bake at 190°C for 20-25 minutes.
Glaze the top of the buns with 50/50 melted honey and water.

Serve warm with butter – best eaten fresh from the oven